Mindful Kids Resources

Articles on Mindfulness for Children:i


What Changes When a School Embraces Mindfulness?a​An article and video on the MindUp program implemented in a school.


Five Things That Need to Happen to Bring Mindfulness Into Education by Patricia Jennings

​How do we bring mindfulness into education for the long term? Jennings lays out five things that need to happen first.


​Mindfulness training helps teens cope with stress and anxiety (Dec 2014) by Gosia Wozniacka ​

Students report that Mindfulness class has helped them better recognize their feelings, deal with anger and distance themselves from destructive thoughts during difficult family situations.


Mindfulness helps parents to cope with special needs (Aug 2014)

With mindfulness techniques parents can blunt the stress of parenting a child with severe developmental disabilities.


Mindfulness is promising treatment for ADHD (June 2014) by Daniel Goleman

Research suggests meditation and mental exercises may be better than drugs at helping people cope with attention problems.


​​Mindfulness For Kids: Why We Should Be Encouraging Young People To Find Inner Peace
(June 2014)

While mindfulness is certainly helping adults deal with negative tendencies such as stress, self-doubt and anxiety, many believe that mindfulness principles could also be hugely beneficial if used for children and teenagers. 


USA Today article (Feb 2014) on Teens Feeling Stressed

Teens say they're feeling the stress in all areas of their lives, from school to friends, work and family. And they aren't always using healthy methods to cope, finds a new national Stress in America survey from the Washington, D.C.-based American Psychological Association.

Mindful Schools, Compassionate Schools  (Nov 2013)

In this presentation from the Greater Good Science Center’s “Practicing Mindfulness & Compassion” conference, the program director for Mindful Schools explains how mindfulness practice helps schools to become more compassionate places.

Mindfulness in Schools Project (Oct 2013)

Richard Burnett and Chris Cullen, co-Founders of the Mindfulness in Schools Project, met in 2007. Along with Chris O’Neil, these schoolteachers had experienced the benefits of mindfulness themselves and wanted to bring it to life in the classroom.


How Yoga Could Help Keep Kids In School (Jul 2013)

Scientific evidence is mounting daily for what many have long sensed: that practices like mindfulness, meditation, and yoga can help us address certain intractable individual and societal problems.


Books  We Recommend on Mindfulness for Children:


Broderick, Patricia C. (2013), Learning to Breathe.   A Mindfulness curriculum for adolescents to cultivate emotion regulation, attention and performance.


Cozolino, Louis (2013), The Social Neuroscience of Education: Optimizing Attachment and Learning in the Classroom.  This book explains how the brain, as a social organism, learns best throughout the lifespan, from our early schooling through late life.


Greenland, Susan K. (2010), The Mindful Child:  How to Help Your Kid Manage Stress and Become Happier, Kinder, and More Compassionate.  This book outlines a detailed program to help children between the ages of 4 and 18 to improve their attention and stress-management skills while becoming more compassionate, in a step-by-step reference that provides exercises, songs and games, and fables that Susan Kaiser Greenland has developed over more than a decade of teaching mindful awareness to kids. 


Lantieri, Linda and Goleman, Daniel (2008), Building Emotional Intelligence.  Techniques to cultivate inner strength in children.


Rechtschaffen, Daniel (2014),The Way of Mindful Education: Cultivating Well-Being in Teachers and Students.   A practical guide for cultivating attention, compassion, and well-being not only in students, but also in teachers themselves. Packed with lesson plans, exercises, and considerations for specific age groups and students with special needs, this working manual demonstrates the real world application of mindfulness practices in K-12 classrooms.


The Hawn Foundation (2011),  The MindUP Curriculum.  MindUP is a comprehensive, classroom-tested, evidence-based curriculum framed around 15 easily implemented lessons that foster social and emotional awareness, enhance psychological well-being, and promote academic success.